UEFA Youth League

Time for another brand-new competition to be added to Project Odyssey’s database.

For the first time ever in a football game, we’ve made UEFA Youth League playable. The last eight under-19 teams still competing for the title have made the cut onto this file.

In order to set a realistic UEFA Youth League on PES, play an 8-team cup with the real-life fixtures and teams.

The next round will be played on the 2nd and 3rd of April, so you still have time to make your own virtual predictions with this simulation – and dive in to play it yourself in any way you prefer.

Teamlist

FC Porto
FC Midtjylland
FC Barcelona
Olympique Lyonnais
Chelsea FC
Dinamo Zagreb
Hoffenheim
Real Madrid

Features

  • Includes all of the last 8 UEFA Youth League participant teams
  • Accurate and editable, ingame-made kits for all teams
  • Correct team crests
  • Correct player names and info
  • NEW! FM stats converted onto PES through a brand-new conversion system invented by @mattmid
  • Main menu and league menu with Project Odyssey’s branding
  • NEW! Hidden player form arrows, increasing realism and unpredictability

Download and installation

Credits

@mattmid and @miguelfcp – Project Odyssey; @sniglet – menus, @peterc10 – PES Editor export tool

Project Odyssey’s work continues. More leagues will be released in the future: stay tuned on our Retro Sports Club and on the Project’s forum thread to catch up with the news.

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They needed a miracle

BK Marienlyst’s record on Denmark’s 2nd Division before Project Odyssey: 18 matches played, 1-1-16 – one win, one draw, sixteen losses.

BK Marienlyst’s record after the release of the league on PO: 1-0-0 – one win, a 1-0 victory over Slagelse, a team that was 22 points ahead of them on the table.

To the football fans: there was a time before Project Odyssey. It is now over, welcome to the new world.

To BK Marienlyst’s staff: you’re welcome.

Georgia on my mind

After Project Odyssey’s release of Denmark’s 2nd Division, it’s time to introduce for the first time ever on a football videogame…Georgia’s top league, Erovnuli Liga.

Teamlist

Chikhura Sachkhere
Dila Gori
Dinamo Tbilisi
Dinamo Batumi
FC Rustavi
Lokomotivi Tbilisi
Saburtalo Tbilisi
Sioni Bolnisi
Torpedo Kutaisi
WIT-Georgia Tbilisi

Features

  • Includes all of Georgia’s 1st Division teams (10 clubs)
  • Accurate and editable, ingame-made kits for all teams
  • Correct team crests
  • Correct player names and info
  • NEW! FM stats converted onto PES through a brand-new conversion system invented by @mattmid
  • Main menu and league menu with Project Odyssey’s branding
  • NEW! Hidden player form arrows, increasing realism and unpredictability

Download and installation

  • Replace your PES6’s option file with the Erovnuli Liga Option File
  • Replace your e_text located on kitserver/dat with our own e_text
  • Et voilà, play PES6.

Credits

@mattmid and @miguelfcp – Project Odyssey; @sniglet – menus, @peterc10 – PES Editor export tool

Project Odyssey’s work continues. More leagues will be released in the future: stay tuned on our Retro Sports Club and on the Project’s forum thread to catch up with the news.

The Marienlyst Challenge?

Now that Project Odyssey’s first league has been released, the Danish 2nd Division is available to play on a retro-PES game.

One of its main attractions is BK Marienlyst, a club which is part of the Group 2 of the competition. So far, this team has played 18 fixtures in real life and has lost…16. Marienlyst has one draw and one win, and has both the league’s worst defensive and offensive record as well. With a total of 4 points conquered so far, they’re currently 12 points away from Skovshoved, the team that is right above them – though Marienlyst has one more match played than them. Clearly, we’re talking about one of the worst teams in the world right now.

Your challenge, should you choose to accept it, is to try and do better on Project Odyssey. Pick Marienlyst, run a league mode save with the correct Division 2 structure and all the participating teams…and just don’t be terrible. Think it’ll be easy? It might prove itself to be a sisyphean task, as PES6’s team hexagon has little doubts about Marienlyst being so much less endowed than its competitors.

Some challenges are just more challenging than others. This one’s only for the hardcore, the strong-minded who never quit. This is the Marienlyst Challenge.

Step 1 – Play a 12-team league mode controlling Marienlyst. Include the real-life participants of the competition, from B93 to Middelfart (yes, the latter is actually a club).

Step 2 – Succeed or die trying: be better than real-life Marienlyst.

Step 3 – If successful, post a screenshot of your feat on Marienlyst’s social media, hence proving your worth as a candidate for the club’s manager position in real life. Even if the chances of a mere PES connaisseur to be able to do better than the current manager are dim, it wouldn’t make much of a difference at this point…

(Step 3 is only for the bravest of the boldest, not recommended for the faint of heart, nor the ones who aren’t already searching for hotels and housing in Odense, Denmark, where the club is located)

If by any chance the idea of managing Marienlyst in real-life doesn’t do anything for you, well, you can always share your completion of the Marienlyst Challenge here on RSC.

…because it’s not that important?

A short while ago we posted our Not That Important article, in which we take a stand and defend the idea that gaming is just a distraction, no matter how passionate; it’s a hobby that serves as complement to a well-lived real life.

This idea seems to be gaining traction, if we take a look at this recent Kotaku article. Someone has been reading the Retro Sports Club…

Many players, even after all these problems and setbacks, keep playing even if the game is making them unhappy, angry or disappointed. Folks, it’s time to stop playing. It’s okay to take a break.

There’s nothing here I’d disagree with. Games are supposed to bring us fun and an enjoyable challenge; if they don’t, they’re not worth our time. Fortunately there are countless games out there for one to play, decade upon decade of titles waiting for people to enjoy them. The issue here is that modern games, particularly the ones that matter most to us here – sports games – are often built to provide virtual, online worlds to the gamer, and once he accepts the premise and becomes part of that “hive”, he enters a position in which he’s bound to lose all control over his gaming life.

I remember taking a few days off GTA Online and returning to see players triple my level already. I remember panicking. I needed to catch up. But I really didn’t. Falling behind isn’t a big deal, even if your brain disagrees.

Here, the writer himself shows why it’ll be hard even for him to follow his own advice. Taking a break from gaming, as he put it, is a luxury that the modern gamer can’t afford after he enters the world of a Ultimate Team or a myClub. As we stated on our own article, these worlds are living organisms that thrive because of the millions of players that support it, so the absence of one of those millions will not only not hurt the world itself in any significant way, but rather the party that loses is exactly the player undergoing a gaming hiatus – for, as this writer states, the gamer will have to play catch-up and make up for the time lost, while everyone else progressed within that virtual world.

The generation of gamers of which I’m a part of never had to face this particular problem. I can’t remember how many times I was able to finish an entire season of a Master League save on a single week/couple of weeks, only to spend many months playing the following season. At times I’d play 5 matches a day, only to play a total of 1 spanning across many weeks. Whatever your schedule looked like, gaming was able to fit it and adapt to one’s real-world ventures. No matter how long my break from gaming was, the Master League save would always be there, waiting for me to get back to it. It didn’t matter whether I spent one day or one year not playing the save, that virtual world would’ve remained unchanged. Such thing is not possible nowadays on these myClubs and Ultimate Teams, as those worlds do move on without you. It’s out of your control.

Many games these days launch in various states of finished. It seems nearly every major game release has a roadmap. It can often feel like these roadmaps are plans for when the game will become better. When it will finally be fun. Maybe even when it finally becomes good? Yet these roadmaps are also a great indication that perhaps it’s best to stop playing and wait.

This is a whole new different issue which is very typical of modern gaming, one that affects sports gaming in an obvious way. We’ll certainly get back to this topic in order to discuss it in a more detailed manner. While the writer speaks of the modern game as a “roadmap”, I prefer to look at it through the eyes of the player himself. That player is, currently, merely a beta-tester for game developers. According to the findings (the reactions) of the majority of those players, the game will be tuned over time through patches and updates. While I certainly applaud the proactivity of these developers, ever eager to please their audience, players now know that the money they spend on a game is not going to get them a finished product – which is something that would be outrageous 10, 15 years ago. Essentially, nowadays gamers pay for the “privilege” of becoming beta-testers. It’s tragically ironic.

Naturally, this process shortens the lifespan of any title as the gamer never quite knows, as the author states, when the game will finally play nicely. For all he knows, he could be waiting for something that might never actually happen.

As we said here before, we’re not consumers, and we surely aren’t beta-testers. We are people who happen to like gaming, but who aren’t desperate enough to cling onto a situation that doesn’t benefit us. If we don’t like a certain game as it currently plays, we’ll just go play something else. This idea puts us back at the driver’s seat, in control.

This is an important thing to remember as more and more games become “live experiences”. I like the idea of a game growing and updating over time, just don’t feel like you need to stick around through all of that evolution.

I get the idea that the author tries to pass on with this article, but one can’t just say words and hope people become magically attracted to its meaning. One can’t just tell people to stop playing because they’re “feeling bad” about gaming, and hope it’ll solve the problem. The issue here is that modern gaming, particularly sports gaming, is all about creating purposely addictive platforms to lure the player in. Get in and play, and you’ll become a beta-tester who’ll never quite know when he’ll actually enjoy the game; get out and don’t play, and you’ll allow your ingame “competitors” to become better than you by evolving on the game’s platform, while you sit back and watch yourself lose. It’s a lose-lose prospect.

Therefore, as much as I see where the author is coming from, deciding to take a break from gaming won’t solve the issue. One first has to comprehend what exactly is the place of the modern player on this modern environment, and when he sees what I see, he’ll understand that almost all of these issues stem from him taking gaming too seriously, and can be solved by adopting the mentality that gaming is not that important at all. It’s a hobby, a passtime, a distraction. Once this is truly internalized, there’ll be no need for gaming websites to write articles with titles such as “It’s Okay to Stop Playing” because the player will already have the habit and passion of gaming under his complete and masterful control. He’ll play what he wants, when he wants, for how long he himself decides to.

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